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  1. #21
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    Default Re: The February 2012 Tutorial Discussion

    Yes, indeed. Timing can make or break 2D, 3D animation, comedy, plays, and other forms of entertainment.

    It's good to come to the party with a concept, too. We had a phrase in advertising called "Dancing Bologna (baloney)" and it connotes stuff that gets your attention, but has no real substance. Sizzle without the steak, in other words.

    A bouncing ball was a good tutorial example, because it's "creatively neutral." It's not entertainment per se, but the cartoon physics of squash and stretch are used all the time in cartoons.

    And it shouldn't go without saying that Xara artwork (Xartwork?) is highly compatible with just about every other graphics product on the market.



    My Best,

    Gary

  2. #22
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    Default Re: The February 2012 Tutorial Discussion

    Hi Gary,

    Great tutorial. The pdf with the video comes in handy.

    cheers,

    Jim Toal

  3. #23
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    Default Re: The February 2012 Tutorial Discussion

    Glad you like it, Jim, and I hope it might come to some use for you in the future, either professionally or just for personal fun.

    When you mention that the PDF comes in handy, was it good for reference after the video, or because (once again) my delivery was too fast?

    Just trying to refine and improve based on feedback,

    —Gary

  4. #24
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    Default Re: The February 2012 Tutorial Discussion

    Back to handrawn's example. I think he is talking about animations showing the effect of gravity. The ball goes up and gets progressively slower until it reaches apogee at which time it gains speed again on the way down. I'm not saying it's not possible with Xara but I am saying it would be difficult and requiring many extra steps to simulate the gravity effect. I'll have to try that and see, cause I might be wrong.
    Larry a.k.a wizard509

    Never give up. You will never fail, you'll just find a whole lot of ways that don't work.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: The February 2012 Tutorial Discussion

    As long as you have both Handrawn's picture and the tutorial as a reference, I don't see why anyone can't—with a little trial and error—come up with a faithful animated representation of a bouncing ball with Earth gravity.

    That wasn't the point of the tutorial—I wanted to get people interested in a verifiably underused Xara feature, and cartoonish exaggeration—which has been used in animation studios for 70 years (squash and stretch cartoon physics)—felt like a good entry point for me to use.

    When I suggested viewers perform variations on what I showed—a bouncing chair or something bouncing while changing colors—well, an accurate representation of a ball bouncing and losing energy ultimately, is a good variation, too!

    My Best,
    —Gary

  6. #26
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    Default Re: The February 2012 Tutorial Discussion

    Yes I understand that wasn't the point, I just thought it interesting and something to consider.
    Larry a.k.a wizard509

    Never give up. You will never fail, you'll just find a whole lot of ways that don't work.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: The February 2012 Tutorial Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by wizard509 View Post
    Back to handrawn's example. I think he is talking about animations showing the effect of gravity
    Hi Larry

    yes

    the apogee [point furthest away from centre in orbital path] is an example of an 'inertia point', that is an instant in the motion of an object when it is actually very fleetingly at rest [ie not moving]

    traditionally animators 'slow out' when motion picks up and 'slow in' when motion slows down - what those terms mean is that you 'bunch up' your drawings and thereby slow down the uniformity of motion, but you do it in such a way as to make the increase in speed visible in the 'slow out' and the decrease in speed visible in the 'slow in'

    the attached shows a pendulum with the [slow out slow in] chart that represents the frames, and you can see the bunching [its a simplified set of course] - doesn't take a lot of imagination to turn that pendulum chart into a ball bouncing from floor to ceiling [hopefully]

    in cell animation all these frames would be drawn [both the keys and the 'inbetweens']

    that covers the timing - I guess you can use tweening in xara to change the shape by generating the inbetweens, rather than having to draw all of them yourself

    [note 'slowing out' is often called 'easing out' and 'slowing in' 'easing in']
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by handrawn; 20 February 2012 at 05:23 PM. Reason: typo
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    on sabbatical 'til ver 11

  8. #28
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    Default Re: The February 2012 Tutorial Discussion

    A very nice aside, Handrawn; this is great stuff for anyone who wants to get beyond the act of animating and immerse themselves in the art of animation.

    And I think there's a certain point (of ambition) where Xara's native animation tools cannot carry you to, for example, a 10 minute animation. It's not the right tool, however, Xara can make quick work of animated titles. Boris wants $$$ for an After Effects plug-in that essentially does what you can do by hand with titling in Xara and export with an alpha.

    __________________________________________________ _

    Ease in and Ease out are natural phenomena, they exist both in the cartoon realm and in the real world. The beginning of an action has built-in acceleration, while when a body loses energy or transfers it, there is a natural ease out of the motion, a de-acceleration. The best example I can think of is a baseball player as they swing the bat and connect with the ball. Of interest in this analogy is that the baseball bat will slow for two reasons: the transfer of energy to the ball, and the baseball player's inclination to slow down after a sufficient amount of swing has been completed.

    In traditional animation, and digital when the folks know what they're doing, this Ease In and Ease out motion non-linear phenomenon is exaggerated, and that's perhaps what makes Porkie Pig, and Buzz Lightyear, et al, seem fantastic and real at the same time. The way in which they move is hyper-real, natural physics are bent, and occasionally broken, but respect is always paid to what goes on in the Real World.

    -g-

  9. #29
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    Default Re: The February 2012 Tutorial Discussion

    Thanks you guys. Very interesting information.
    Larry a.k.a wizard509

    Never give up. You will never fail, you'll just find a whole lot of ways that don't work.

  10. #30
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    Default Re: The February 2012 Tutorial Discussion

    Well Larry, Wizard and Gary (seems familar that, can't quite put my finger on it) You've lost me with all the jargon so I'll stick to bounce, squash and stretch for now until I get the hang of animation. It's good fun learning though Had to slow the speed down a bit of the original to get the extra animation to do what I wanted, I'm no expert but it looks not to bad for a bit of fun.

    Stygg
    Attached Files Attached Files

 

 

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